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Twelfth International Workshop

on molecular aspects of myeloid stem cell development and leukemia

May 7-10, 2018
Cincinnati Children's Hospital
Medical Center
3333 Burnet Avenue
Cincinnati, Ohio 45229

About

Since 1995, the Workshop on Molecular Aspects of Myeloid Stem Cell Development and Leukemia has offered a highly successful presentation series from approximately 40-50 renowned national and international researchers and clinicians.

The goal of these biennial workshops is to bring together investigators with expertise in complementary aspects of stem cell biology and myelopoiesis - from normal myelopoiesis to myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative syndromes. Basic researchers and clinician investigators from both sides of the Atlantic, Australia and Japan come together biennially to discuss their latest findings in a close and informal setting. The workshop brings together scientists with expertise in normal and abnormal hematopoiesis and clinicians who treat leukemia/MDS/MPD patients and also have active research programs in these diseases.

Participants achieve a better understanding of critical steps/factors that regulate hematopoiesis, their impact in leukemogenesis, and potential relevance in clinical settings. Although there are other workshops and meetings dedicated to understanding the regulation of hematopoiesis or clinical advances in leukemia, this workshop uniquely brings together both clinicians and scientists in a relaxed forum.

acute-myeloid-leukemia

Speakers

Abdel-Wahab, Omar
Memorial Sloan Kettering

Aifantis, Iannis
New York University

Abkowitz, Janis
University of Washington

Bonifer, Constanze
University of Birmingham, UK

Bresnick, Emery
University of Wisconsin

Carlesso, Nadia
City of Hope

Carroll, Martin
University of Pennsylvania

Castilla, Lucio
University of Massachusetts

Cheng, Tao
State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Tianjin, China

Crispino, John
Northwestern University

Delwel, Ruud
Erasmus University, the Netherlands

Figueroa, Maria
University of Miami

Filippi, Marie-Dominique
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Frenette, Paul
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Godley, Lucy
University of Chicago

Goldfarb, Adam N.
University of Virginia

Goodell, Peggy
Baylor College of Medicine

Gottgens, Bertie
Cambridge University UK

Graubert, Tim
Massachusetts General Hospital

Grimes, H. Leighton
Cincinnati Childrens Hospital

Guzman, Monica
Weill Cornell

Singh, Harinder
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Hiebert, Scott
Vanderbilt University

Horwitz, Marshall
University of Washington

Huang, Gang
Cincinnati Childrens Hospital

Kalfa, Theodosia
Cincinnati Children's Hospital

Kharas, Michael
Memorial Sloan Kettering

Krause, Diane
Yale University

Le Beau, Michelle
University of Chicago

Levine, Ross
Memorial Sloan Kettering

Link, Dan
Washington University School of Medicine

List, Alan
Moffitt Cancer Center

Lucas, Daniel
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Majeti, Ravi
Stanford University

Melnick, Ari
Weill Cornell

Milsom, Michael
German Cancer Research Center, Germany

Moore, Kateri
Mount Sinai New York

Murphy Kenneth
Washington University

Nerlov, Claus
University of Oxford, UK

Nimer, Stephen
University of Miami

Novina, Carl
Dana Farber

Papapetrou, Eirini
Mount Sinai

Passegue, Emmanuelle
Columbia University

Sauvageau, Guy
University of Montreal, Canada

Schroeder, Timm
ETH Zurich, Switzerland

Shimamura, Akiko
Harvard University

Starczynowski, Daniel
Cincinnati Childrens Hospital

Stegmaier, Kim
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Steidl, Uli
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Tenen, Dan
Harvard/CSI Singapore

Touw, Ivo
Erasmus University, the Netherlands

Trumpp, Andreas
German Cancer Research Center, Germany

Vyas, Paresh
University of Oxford, UK

Wang, Qianfei "Jeffrey"
Beijing Institute of Genomics, China

Xu, Jian
UT Southwestern

Zhang, Dong-Er
University of California, San Diego

Agenda

Monday May 7

6:00-7:30 AM

Breakfast at the 21C Hotel
“COUNTRY PICNIC BREAKFAST”

7:20 AM

BUS 1, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

7:30 AM

BUS 2, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

7:40 AM

BUS 3, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

CCHMC S1.203-204


8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Session Chairs: Lionel Blanc and Punam Malik


8:00 AM

Emery Bresnick, University of Wisconsin-Madison
GATA Factor/Heme Multi-omics Reveals a Trace Metal-Dependent
Cellular Differentiation Mechanism


8:30 AM

John Crispino, Northwestern University
A CHAF1B-dependent molecular switch in hematopoiesis and leukemia


9:00 AM

Theodosia Kalfa, CCHMC
The Erythro-Myeloblastic Island: A Hematopoietic Niche Balancing Erythropoiesis and Myelopoiesis


9:30 AM

Diane Krause, Yale University
Role of the cell cycle in megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor fate specification


10:00 AM

Jan Abkowitz, University of Washington
Heme-globin dyscoordination and the pathogenesis of macrocytic anemia in MDS


10:30 AM

Break


11:00 AM

Tim Graubert, Mass General Hospital
Spliceosomal Mutations Induce R Loop-Associated ATR Signaling


11:30 AM

Stephen Nimer, University of Miami
Alteration of RUNX1 Function by Chromosomal Translocations or Protein-Protein Interactions


12:00 PM

Omar Abdel-Wahab, MSKCC
Convergent Effects of MDS-Associated Spliceosomal Gene Mutations on Innate Immune Signaling and Inflammation


12:30 PM

Gang Huang, CCHMC
Pseudohypoxia as a Common Mechanism Underlying Myelodysplastic Syndromes


1:00 PM


2:00 PM to 5:00 PM

Session Chairs: Ken Figueroa and Michelle Le Beau


2:00 PM

Uli Steidl, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
MDS Progression to AML at the Stem Cell Level


2:30 PM

Alan List, Moffit Cancer Center
Autologous DNA Exposure Activates Innate Immune Axes in MDS


3:00 PM

Emmanuelle Passegue, Columbia University
Inflammaging - a cross-talk between two aging systems: stroma and blood


3:30 PM


4:00 PM

Michael Milsom, DKZF-Heidelberg, Germany
Inflammatory stress fails to impact on HSC numbers but drives their progressive and irreversible functional decline


4:30 PM

Daniel Lucas, CCHMC
An endothelial niche uncouples emergency granulopoiesis from bone marrow suppression


LIGHTNING ROUND
Session Chair: Dan Tenen

5:00 PM

Terry Rogers Bishop, NIDDK
Funding Opportunities from the NIDDK at NIH

5:05 PM

Hideyo Hirai, Kyoto University, Japan
C/EBPb isoforms sequentially regulate proliferation and differentiation of regenerating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

5:104 PM

Claudia Waskow, Friedrich Schiller University, Germany
Cross-talk between embryonic and adult hematopoiesis

5:15 PM

Jan-Henning Klusman, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany
Modelling the progression of a preleukemic stage to overt leukemia in children with Down Syndrome.

5:20 PM

Grant Challen, Washington University in St. Louis
Jarid2 restricts self-renewal capacity in hematopoietic progenitors and is a tumor suppressor in chronic myeloid neoplasms.

5:25 PM

Greg Wang, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Epigenetic regulation of myeloid malignancy

5:30 PM

Andrew Mutean, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
A novel PAF1c-SETDB1 interaction mediates H3K9 methylation of pro-leukemic genes and suppresses leukemogenesis.

5:35 PM

David Wiest, Fox Chase Cancer Center
Ribosomal protein control of hematopoietic stem cell transformation through regulation of a lipoxygenase.

5:40 PM

Goro Sashida, Kumamoto University, Japan
Lineage-specific RUNX2 super enhancer activates MYC via a chromosomal translocation and promotes development of blastic plasmacytoid dentritic cell neoplasm.

5:45 PM

Megan McNerney, University of Chicago
Murine CUX1 reduction disrupts HSC homeostasis and controls the severity and mortality of MDS in a dose-dependent manner.

5:50 PM

Jenn Trowbridge, The Jackson Laboratory
Npm1-ca overcomes the differentiation block of Dnmt3a-mutant LT-HSC to transition bone marrow failure to myeloproliferation.

5:55 PM

Brad Blaser, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center
Enforced expression of cxcl8 by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells increases endothelial cell cuddling and expands hematopoietic progenitor cells in adult zebrafish.

6:00 PM

Stephanie Xie, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada
Sphingolipids govern the myeloid commitment of human hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells.


6:15 PM

Transportation to The American Sign Museum
1330 Monmouth Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45225 (NOT Monmouth Ave. in Kentucky)


6:30-9:30 PM


9:30 PM

BUS1, BUS2 and BUS3 Transportation to the 21C Hotel


Tuesday May 8

6:00-7:30 AM

Breakfast at the 21C Hotel
“POWER BREAKFAST BUFFET”

7:20 AM

BUS 1, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

7:30 AM

BUS 2, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

7:40 AM

BUS 3, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

CCHMC S1.203-204


8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Session Chairs: Jose Cancelas and Iannis Aifantis


8:00 AM

Adam Goldfarb, University of Virginia School of Medicine
Human HSPC Dysregulation of RUNX3 in MDS and Normal Aging May Contribute to Perturbations in Lineage Output


8:30 AM

Nadia Carlesso, City of Hope
Defective Notch activation in mesenchymal cells cooperates with aging in the development of myeloid neoplasms


9:00 AM

Ken Figueroa, University of Miami
Epigenetic Reprogramming of Enhancer and Regulatory Elements During Aging of human HSCs


9:30 AM

Marie Dominique Filippi, CCHMC
Mitochondria determine the lifespan of hematopoietic stem cells


10:00 AM

Andreas Trumpp, DKFZ-Heidelberg, Germany
Hematopoietic Stem Cells Are Regulated by Alternative Polyadenylation


10:30 AM

Break


11:00 AM

Timm Schroeder, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Hematopoiesis at single-cell and single-molecule resolution


11:30 AM

Iannis Aifantis, NYU
Profiling the bone marrow microenvironment at single cell resolution


12:00 PM

Paul Frenette, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Adrenergic nerve degeneration of the aging bone marrow niche reprograms HSCs to exhibit myeloid cell differentiation bias and other aging characteristics


12:30 PM

Lucy Godley, University of Chicago
The frequency with which germline mutations cause MDS in young patients


1:00 PM


2:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Session Chairs: Akiko Shimamura and Ivo Touw


2:00 PM

Kateri Moore, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai
Induction of a Hemogenic Program in Mouse Fibroblasts


2:30 PM

Eirini Papaetrou, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai
Studying the biology and therapeutic vulnerabilities of leukemia stem cells using patient-derived iPSC models


3:00 PM

Akiko Shimamura, Boston Children’s Hospital
iPSC model of bone marrow failure and MDS identifies a novel therapeutic strategy.


3:30 PM

Carl Novina, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Activated TGFb signaling in early hematopoietic progenitors promotes bone marrow failure in Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome


4:00 PM

Dan Link, Washington University in St. Louis
Regulation of the hematopoietic niche by TGF-β signaling


4:30 PM


5:00 PM

Marshall Horwitz, University of Washington
Targeting Transcription Factors in Familial and Sporadic Leukemia


5:30 PM

Lee Grimes, CCHMC
Mouse modeling of severe congenital neutropenia-associated mutations


6:00 PM

Ivo Touw, Erasmus University Medical Center, The Netherlands
Modeling leukemic progression of severe congenital neutropenia in iPSC.


6:45 PM

Transportation to the Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center
44 E 6th St, Cincinnati, OH 45202


7:00-10:00 PM


Wednesday May 9

6:30-7:30 AM

Breakfast at the 21C Hotel
“QUEEN CITY HOT BREAKFAST”

7:20 AM

BUS 1, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

7:30 AM

BUS 2, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

7:40 AM

BUS 3, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

CCHMC S1.203-204


8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Session Chairs: Harinder Singh and Ari Melnick


8:00 AM

Harinder Singh, CCHMC
Using integrative genomics to reveal the functional enhancer landscape of activated B cells.


8:30 AM

Ken Murphy, Washington University in St. Louis
Development of dendritic cell subsets


9:00 AM

Bertie Gottgens, Cambridge University, UK
Capturing Dynamic Changes in Haematopoietic Differentiation Landscapes


9:30 AM

Dong-Er Zhang, University of California San Diego
Hippo kinase deficiency cooperates with JAK2(V617F) to promote myeloproliferative neoplasm progression in mice


10:00 AM

Jian Xu, University of Texas Southwestern
Loss of EZH2 Activates BCAA Metabolism to Drive Myeloid Transformation


10:30 AM

Break


11:00 AM

Conny Bonifer, University of Birmingham, UK
Subtype-specific regulatory network rewiring in acute myeloid leukemia


11:30 AM

Tao Cheng, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, China
Reprogramming Factors Preferentially Kill Leukemia Cells as Opposed to Normal Hematopoietic Cells


12:00 PM

Martin Carroll, U Penn
Combinatorial Proteomics Analysis Demonstrates FLT3 Regulation of EZH2 expression


12:30 PM


2:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Session Chairs: Daniel Starczynowski and Ross Levine


1:30 PM

Ruud Delwel, Erasmus University, The Netherlands
Oncoprotein enhancer hijacking reverses active chromatin state and deregulate gene expression and topology


2:00 PM

Claus Nerlov, University of Oxford, England
Myelo-erythroid progenitors and leukemias


2:30 PM

Peggy Goodell, Baylor College of Medicine
Mutant NPM1 maintains the leukemic state through HOX expression


3:00 PM

Ari Melnick, Weill Cornell Medicine
Genetically-defined AML Subgroups Represent Diverse Epigenetic Allelic Heterogeneity Landscape


3:30 PM


4:00 PM

Guy Sauvageau, University of Montreal, Canada
Identification of an Electron Transport Chain Vulnerability in Acute Myeloid Leukemia


4:30 PM

Kim Stegmaier, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Emerging Targets in AML through Functional Genomic Screens


5:00 PM

Dan Tenen, Harvard and Cancer Institute of Singapore
New therapeutics targeting the CEBPA pathway in Acute Myeloid Leukemia


5:30 PM

Daniel Starczynowski, CCHMC
U2AF1 mutations induce oncogenic innate immune pathways by regulating the expression of active IRAK4 isoforms in AML and MDS


6:15 PM

Transportation to 21C Hotel


6:30-8:00 PM

POSTER SESSION


8:00 PM

dinner on your own


Thursday May 10

6:30-7:30 AM

Breakfast at the 21C Hotel
“POWER BREAKFAST BUFFET”

7:20 AM

BUS 1, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

7:30 AM

BUS 2, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

7:40 AM

BUS 3, Transportation to Cincinnati Children’s

CCHMC S1.203-204


2:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Session Chairs: Steven Gore


8:00 AM

Paresh Vyas, University of Oxford, UK
The clonal basis of AML therapy response and resistance to enasidenib.


8:30 AM

Ross Levine, MSKCC
Role of mutations in epigenetic regulators in pathogenesis of AML


9:00 AM

Qian-Fei Wang, Beijing Institute of Genomics, China
Precision Medicine and Clonal Evolution in Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treated with Low-Dose Chemotherapy plus G-CSF for Remission Induction


9:30 AM

Ravi Majeti, Stanford University
Metabolic Differences between IDH1 and IDH2 Mutant Acute Myeloid Leukemia Yield Therapeutic Vulnerabilities


10:00 AM

Break


10:30 AM

Lucio Castilla, U Mass Worchester
CBFβ-SMMHC/RUNX1 Regulate MYC Expression by Modulating Chromatin Dynamics at Distal Enhancers in Inv(16) Leukemia


11:00 AM

Michael Kharas, MSKCC
Towards therapeutic targeting of the MUSASHI RNA binding protein network


11:30 AM

Scott Hiebert, Vanderbilt
Targeting Histone Modifying Enzymes in t(8;21) AML


12:00 PM

Monica Guzman, Weill Cornell Medicine
Novel Organoid-Like Culture System to Evaluate Leukemia Stem Cells


12:30 PM


1:00 PM and 1:30 PM

Transportation to CVG or 21C Hotel


Submit Abstract

  • All abstracts should follow the ASH (American Society of Hematology) format guidelines.
  • All abstracts should be submitted in Arial, 11 point font with one inch margins all around.
  • Posters should be 3ft x 6ft.
  • All abstracts must be submitted by March 1, 2018.
  • Email abstracts to Erin Davis.
    erin.davis2@cchmc.org

Hotel

21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati
609 Walnut Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
513.578.6600

The hotel is full and no longer accepting reservations in the Myeloid18 block.

Room Pricing
$189.00 Single/Double
Room occupancy rate plus 17.5% applicable state and local taxes.

Visit website

21c

Sponsors

epe-foundation
alexs-lemonade-stand
gabrielles-angel-foundation
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cchmc-cancer-and-blood-diseases-institute
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American Sign Museum

Come take a walk down Memory Lane and experience the only public sign museum in America. Visit the American Sign Museum and find a treasure trove of information relative to the rich tradition of sign fabrication and design. You can also find news of sign preservation efforts throughout the country and even visit the Museum's permanent collection.

Visit website

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Explore Cincinnati

contemporary-arts-center

Contemporary Arts Center
The CAC is one of the first contemporary art institutions in the United States. It is a pioneering contemporary art museum located in Cincinnati, Ohio. The CAC is a non-collecting museum that focuses on new developments in painting, sculpture, photography and more.

Visit website

cincinnati-art-museum

Cincinnati Art Museum
The Cincinnati Art Museum is one of the oldest art museums in the United States. Founded in 1881, it was the first purpose-built art museum west of the Alleghenies. Its collection of over 60,000 works make it one of the most comprehensive collections in the Midwest.

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cincinnati-zoo-and-botanical-garden

Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden
The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden is one of the oldest zoos in the United States. It opened in 1875, just 14 months after the Philadelphia Zoo on July 1, 1874. The Reptile House is the oldest zoo building in the United States, dating from 1875.

Visit website

bb-riverboats

BB Riverboats
Learn about the history of the river, take in a magnificent meal, or dance under the stars on an unbelievable journey you will never forget. BB Riverboats offers a wide variety of cruises ranging from lunch and dinner cruises to sightseeing cruises and all-day mini vacations.

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cincinnati-museum-center

Cincinnati Museum Center
The Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, is a passenger railroad station in the Queensgate neighborhood of Cincinnati. After the decline of railroad travel, most of the building was converted to other uses, and now houses museums, theaters and more.

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fountain-square

Fountain Square
Fountain Square attracts over 2 million people annually to its special events, free concerts, tailgates, and lunchtime contests. It’s a place to meet friends for morning coffee, or gather for lunch. A place to learn about Cincinnati history and begin, or end, your evening downtown.

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Pyramid Hill

Pyramid Hill
Pyramid Hill is an outdoor museum focusing on monumental pieces of sculpture in an environment of meadows, forests, and various gardens. They also feature a 10,000 square foot Ancient Sculpture Museum displaying Egyptian, Greek, Roman and Etruscan sculpture thousands of years old.

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The Taft Museum of Art

The Taft Museum of Art
The Taft Museum of Art is one of the finest small art museums in America. A National Historic Landmark built in 1820, the Taft is home to an extensive art collection that includes European and American master paintings, Chinese porcelains, and European decorative arts.

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Contact

Scientific Issues
H. Leighton Grimes PhD
Phone: 513.636.6089
lee.grimes@cchmc.org

Logistic Issues
Erin Davis
Phone: 513.803.2152
erin.davis2@cchmc.org

Danielle Davis
Phone: 513.636.1773
danielle.davis@cchmc.org

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